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Wellington, NZ
Friday, November 24, 2017
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Then and now: Te Kura online – a history of change

From 100 isolated primary kids in 1922 to over 23,000 enrolments today, Te Kura Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu (Te Kura) - formerly The Correspondence School – has a long tradition of adapting to meet the changing needs of the New Zealand school system.

New learning support initiative to be extended beyond CoL

Education Minister Nikki Kaye confirms the new learning support services programme will extend to schools not in Communities of Learning (CoL).

Statutory manager steps into Kelston Deaf Education Centre

A school that looks after about 1200 deaf students across the upper North Island has been placed under limited statutory management.

Cries for help for Northland’s children

Northland Age editor Peter Jackson says it's time to put kids in a position where they can benefit from an education.

Meet Thomas’ new teacher: A dog

Thomas Preston was falling behind in class - until he started reading to a dog.

Expo for young people with disabilities

More than 25 agencies will gather at the Historic Village to share information about what support and funding they can offer young people with disabilities and their families.

SIGNALLING AN END TO READER/WRITERS – The effectiveness of assistive technologies

When Kapiti College found providing reader/writers to its growing number of dyslexic students unsustainable, it looked to assistive technologies for answers

Education Crisis Unaddressed

In the lead up to the election, Education For All (EFA) note only the Labour and Greens websites acknowledge Inclusive Education and outline measures to achieve an education system that will enable all students to participate and succeed, including disabled students.

Ruapehu’s technology hub – just one part of the puzzle

All schools strive to engage with their communities. Some do it better than others. Here, JUDE BARBACK looks at an outstanding example of school-iwi partnerships in Ruapehu.

SPECIAL EDUCATION FUNDING: why we shouldn’t rob the secondary sector

DR JUDITH SELVARAJ says we need to seriously consider whether pitting the compulsory sector against the non-compulsory sector is a good idea.
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Govt rejects secondary teacher pay rise proposal

The PPTA is disappointed at the Government's rejection of their proposal to increase secondary teachers' salaries by five per cent to help alleviate teacher shortage.

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