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Thursday, December 9, 2021

The sector speaks up: the future of NZ education

Education Review’s outstanding ‘Sector Voices’ special e-edition was published at the end of 2015, bringing together the varied and considered opinions of leaders, principals and teachers to reveal the key issues New Zealand education faces going forward. Here is a taste of some of the topics and views that emerged.

Maths report raises more questions than answers

A new report has revealed declining standards in children’s numeracy and sparked criticism and controversy about the way Kiwi kids are taught maths.

Hitting the ground running: meeting the National Standards at age 5

Massey University doctoral student SARAH AIONO discusses the impact of National Standards on students in their first year of schooling.

School assessment – is it time to change NCEA and National Standards?

With issues surrounding moderation, consistency and ranking continuing to plague NCEA and National Standards, JUDE BARBACK considers some ideas touted to bring more relevancy, meaning and fairness to our national models of assessment.

Play-based learning: producing critical, creative and innovative thinkers.

STEPHANIE MENZIES enters a plea to bring play back into the classroom.

Beyond the decile system

Many in the education sector believe the decile system isn’t working. Even the Minister of Education calls it “a blunt instrument”, and says she’d like to ditch it. Exactly what’s wrong with deciles, and can they be fixed? asks ELIZABETH McLEOD.

Investing in Educational Success (IES) – moving on from stalemate

With the Government’s Investing in Educational Success (IES) policy now underway, JUDE BARBACK takes stock of the loose ends, most significantly how the NZEI’s new initiative will work alongside a policy it has rejected.

Charter schools one year in – are they working, and for whom?

A year since the first partnership schools opened their doors JUDE BARBACK considers what the first independent evaluation of the model should be considering.

Lack of support, disinterest, and high costs perceived barriers to higher education

JUDE BARBACK considers the findings of a recent survey that reveal high costs, lack of support and lack of interest as deterrents to pursuing tertiary education in New Zealand. 

The yellow brick road to EDUCANZ

The notion of EDUCANZ’s so-called ‘independence’ is questioned as the new legislation makes its way through Parliament.

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