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Monday, July 22, 2019
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Then and now: Te Kura online – a history of change

From 100 isolated primary kids in 1922 to over 23,000 enrolments today, Te Kura Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu (Te Kura) - formerly The Correspondence School – has a long tradition of adapting to meet the changing needs of the New Zealand school system.

Education, environment and equality hot topics for young Kiwis

The environment, education and equality are what concern young Kiwis the most, according to a new survey designed to inform the programme for this year’s Festival for the Future.New Zealand’s biggest festival for young...

Latest Teacher-led Innovation Fund projects announced

A teaching project at an early childhood education (ECE) centre in Auckland is among 33 new and innovative teaching projects in schools and ECE centres that are now able to get underway thanks to funding from...

Digital technology becoming compulsory in school curriculum

Digital technologies learning is to be added to the school curriculum

Digital fluency investment marks biggest change to curriculum in a decade

A new National Digital Championship aimed at exciting students to use digital technologies to come up with innovate ways to solve community, social or environmental challenges is among the initiatives included in a $40...

There’s no iPad in team – or is there?

Tablet devices are excellent for individual independent learning, but do they promote collaboration in the classroom? JUDE BARBACK finds out.

Girls mean business

Young people entering the workforce today are likely to have at least seven different careers during their working lives, and many of today's careers won't exist in 10 years.

Internet access is boosting Kiwi children’s learning – but many parents are missing out

By: Simon Collins A new survey has found that Kiwi kids are learning online at school, often from their first year at primary school - but many parents are missing out on the action.The vast...

Three major questions for three major thought leaders

Education Review asks three leading international educationalists – Sugata Mitra, Sir John Jones and Frances Valintine – to respond to three big questions.

Will CoOLs give the virtual learning network a permanent home?

Will communities of online learning (CoOLs) provide the Virtual Learning Network with the resourcing it needs to be sustainable and continue to develop? Or will they unleash an open educational marketplace that has the potential to undermine public schooling? JUDE BARBACK looks at the most polarising element of the Education (Update) Amendment Bill.
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Late birthday boosts high-school achievement – study

Children born in the later half of each year have a better chance of doing well at high school years later, a new study...

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Sponsored: Security first: trusting the digital transformation in education

By Richard Favero, Founder and Executive Chairman, Soprano Design Disruptive technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI), collaboration tools, and cloud-based services are becoming the ‘norm’ in...
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